4DCellFate

Developing a global understanding of the PRC and NuRD complexes in stem cell differentiation and in disease

News

The project's main outputs are summarised in a 4DCellFate video that can be found on youtube. It includes interviews of the coordinator Luciano Di Croce and the two PIs Ernest Laue and Brian Hendrich as well as animations to explain the scientific background.

Two versions can be found, the full version of about 15min and a short version of about 6min.

Ben Lehner has been awarded the prestigious Eppendorf Award for Young European Investigators for 2013.

Luciano Di Croce was elected as a new EMBO member, bringing the total number of EMBO members in our consortium up to six.

Dr. Michiel Vermeulen, of UMC Utrecht, has received the highly prestigious European Research Council (ERC) starting grant. ERC starting grants are meant to support scientists who are in the initial stage of their careers but who have already proven themselves to be world-class researchers, with funding of 1.5 million Euro over 5 years.

EMBO Encounters recently published the following news article we submitted about the 4DCellFate project:

The fate of stem cells in four dimensions

An ambitious new project, 4DCellFate (www.4dcellfate.eu), will study the roles of the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase (NuRD) and Polycomb Repressive (PRC) complexes in regulating differentiation in embryonic stem cells.

Barcelona, February 13th, 2012. As life begins, embryonic stem cells start to divide and develop into tissue ("differentiate"). Each stem cell has the potential to differentiate into different types of tissue cells, such as neurons, muscle, or blood cells, and the molecular mechanisms that determine its fate are highly complex. The earliest steps of differentiation are orchestrated by sophisticated and dynamic protein machineries.

The following news article about the 4DCellFate project was published on the EU Cordis site:

Researchers have just launched an EU-funded project that will investigate the different ways embryonic stem cells divide.

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